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Non Fiction by Philip José Farmer (1): Articles
The entries: articles, essays, reviews, tributes, autobiographical pieces, memoirs, biographies, are in alphabetical order of the title. If more than one publication is listed, the publication of which a cover scan is included is indicated with a . Click on the cover to see it enlarged.

Acceptance Speech
At the Nebula Banquet in Los Angeles in April 2001 Phil Farmer gave a short acceptance speech, which has been printed in this collection. Robert Silverberg wrote for this book "An Appreciation" of Phil.
  • Nebula Awards Showcase 2002, edited by Kim Stanley Robinson
    Roc, ISBN 0-451-45878-8, trade paperback, 04/2002

Ray Lundgren
   

The Affair of Logical Lunatics
The text of a lecture in the 'Olive B. White Lecture Series', May 13, 1971.
This article had been announced several times for publication in Science Fiction Review, from #36 on, but it never appeared in SFR.
  • Farmerage Vol.1 No. 3, February 1979
    [Fanzine, edited by George H. Scheetz.]

   

An Appreciation
A memoir on Robert Bloch who had died in 1994. Phil and his wife, Bette, "...have loved the man since we first met him in 1952...". Farmer shares some anecdotes and his thoughts about Bob Bloch, "...the human being of splendid virtues and minor weaknesses...".
  • Locus #406, November 1994
    [SF newszine, edited by Charles N. Brown.]

   

The Arms of Tarzan
This is the text of a speech given September 5th, 1970 during the Detroit Dum-Dum banquet. On the cover is Tarzan's Coat of Arms, designed by Farmer and drawn by Bjo Trimble.
  • The Burroughs Bulletin #22, Summer 1971 
    [Fanzine, edited by George T. McWhorter.]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 0-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here

Philip Farmer
+ Bjo Trimble
   

Blueprint for Free Beer
In this article Farmer explores the free sex that would come along with the type of society that is based on an economy of abundance, which idea he uses in the stories "Riders of the Purple Wage" and "Seventy Years of Decpop".
  • Knight, Volume 6, No. 1, July 1967
    [Men's magazine, edited by Jared Butter.]

   

Book Reviews
A review of the non-fiction book The Prometheus Project by Gerald Feinberg. Farmer: "Very good. Very stimulating. The book rings true, and I recommend it." In his book Feinberg describes his ideas about how to go on with the long-range goals of humanity. However, Farmer doesn't agree with Feinberg's idea about how the short-time problems in the world will or can be solved.
  • Science Fiction Review #39, August 1970
    [Fanzine, edited by Richard E. Geis.]
  • ("Review of The Prometheus Project")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Alicia Austin
   

Buddha Contemplates His Novel
Subtitled: "Or, God and Humankind Redefined"
A Lecture & Notes, not used and previously unpublished, about Farmer's ideas -"...as an amateur theologian and a professional writer..."- on science fiction and religion.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 15, January 2009
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Charles R. Tanner
Obituary. Farmer: "I loved his stories when I was a kid; I loved Charlie when I met him; this is why I wrote this; I did'nt want him to go down into the dust unnoted."
  • Locus #155, February 1974
    [SF newszine, edited by Charles N. Brown.]

   

Correspondence on the Khokarsa Series
A letter written by Phil Farmer in 1973 and sent to both John Harwood and Frank Brueckel, about the ideas these three men had on the Khokarsa series.
 

Bob Eggleton
   

Creating Artificial Worlds
Article. This is the text of a speech given April 19, 1978 in a series of lectures, called "Facts About Science Fiction: The Writers Speak" at the University of California at Berkeley.
Farmer researched and extrapolated the idea of the North and South American continents never rising from the sea, and all the implications this would have. He used this concept for the novel Gate of Time.
  • Pulsar, Summer 1979
    [Fanzine, edited by ?. Also in this issue an interview with Phil Farmer.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
     


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

Dede Weil: An Appreciation
Obituary of Ellen R. "Dede" Weil.
  • Locus #479, December 2000
    [SF newszine, edited by Charles N. Brown.]

   

Doc Wildman's Coat of Arms
Based on Phil's description and four pages with notes and drawings, with additional research and educational guesses by Win and Lisa Eckert, has artist Keith Howel drawn a final version of Doc Wildman's Coat of Arms.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 14, October 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]
  • as "The Wildman (Savage) Coat of Arms"
    The Evil in Pemberley House (Limited Edition Chapbook)

    Subterranean Press, no ISBN, chapbook, 09/2009 
    [With four pages of notes and drawings by Farmer. The Coat of Arms is printed on the cover.]

Charles Berlin
   

Edgar Rice Burroughs
Essay, about ERB's early career and his most famous character, Tarzan.
  • 20th Century Fiction, edited by George Woodcock
    Gale/St.James (Reference Guide to English Literature), ISBN 0-91228-919-8, hardcover, 07/1985
  • ("An Appreciation of Edgar Rice Burroughs")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
     


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

Faith in 2097
The text of a speech about faith in the future, what would it be one hundred years from now. Faith and religion is a topic often used by Farmer in his stories. He has some interesting views in this article.


Laura Givens
   

Farmer on Wilson
Farmer discusses some of Robert Anton Wilson's work - for instance the Illuminatus Trilogy, which he had read some months before - and describes the author as follows: "...Robert Anton Wilson (RAW) is the Kilgore Trout of the Quantum-Cum-Chtulhu universes...".
Preceded by a discussion about Farmer's Riverworld books by Wilson in "Wilson on Farmer".
  • Heavy Metal #54, September 1981
    [Adult comic magazine, edited by Julie Simmons-Lynch.]
  • ("God's Hat")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

Chris Achilleos
   

Farmer's Lupoff Week
A review of Chrysalis, edited by Roy Torgeson. But reviews by Farmer - he did a few others - are never a review alone. With this one he takes the opportunity to vent a little steam about blurbs and covers, because "...Over the years, pressure, fueled by irritation and sometimes anger, has been building up in my boiler...".
  • Algol #31, Spring 1978
    [Fanzine, edited by Andrew Porter.]
  • ("A Review of Chrysalis")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

Jack Gaughan
   

Farmer Writes
Autobiographical note, as part of a short biography. PJF writes about twelve started series, about Ralph von Wau Wau and the other stories in the fictional author series, and about some other writing plans he had at the time.
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature (Volume 2: Contemporary Science Fiction Authors II), edited by R. Reginald
    Gale Research, ISBN 0-8103-1051-1, hardcover [no dustjacket], -/1979

   

The Feral Human in Mythology and Fiction
Essay, in which Farmer explores some of the many tales from around the world in folktales, legends and myths about animals giving food and protection to children. Also the more modern feral man stories, like The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling, Jan of the Jungle by Otis Adelbert Kline, and - of course - the Tarzan stories by Burroughs.
  • Mother Was A Lovely Beast, edited by Philip José Farmer
    Chilton, ISBN 0-8019-5964-0, hardcover, -/1974 
    Pyramid (V4071), ISBN 0-515-04071-1, paperback, 01/1976

D. Dyen
   

From ERB to Ygg (Part 1)
Article, in which Farmer follows the ancestry of Edgar Rice Burroughs back to the Norse god Ygg.
A second part was announced for ERBivore issue #8, but that was never published.
  • ERBivore #6-7, August 1973 
    [Canadian fanzine, edited by Philip J. Currie.]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here


G.M. Farley
   

Getting A-Long with Heinlein
A sort of review of Time Enough For Love by Robert A. Heinlein. Well, it's more an article based upon the publication of this book, in which Farmer describes the writing phases of Heinlein - more mature than in his early days, but still a phase to go - and about loving and hating Heinlein's work. Very interesting.
  • Moebius Trip Library S.F. Echo #19, January 1974 
    [Fanzine, edited by Edward C Connor.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

   

The Golden Age and the Brass
Article. PJF talks about his early reading as a very young boy, till the time when he started with the books by Edgar Rice Burroughs. He read each ERB book many times, but "To get them I had to visit the local libraries, reserve them, and then, after waiting a few weeks, seize them, fondle them, and dream over them during the two weeks I was allowed to keep them out." PJF would have liked it very much if his father had owned these books, but he build up his own collection one by one over the years. Now, Farmer's son could read them easily, but he seems only interested in comic books...
  • The Burroughs Bulletin #12, 1956
    [Fanzine, edited by George T. McWhorter.]
  • Burroughs Bulletin Omnibus, -/1963
    [Reprint of the issues 1-12]
  • Burroughs Bulletin Omnibus, softcover, -/2005
    [New reprint, with color covers, of the issues 1-12]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006



   

The Great Korak-Time Discrepancy
Article. In Erbania #28, December 1971 (see under) Farmer already discussed the birthdate of Tarzan and Korak. In this article again rises the question about the date of birth of Tarzan's son, and Farmer concludes that Korak is not the son of Tarzan but actually his nephew.
  • ERB-dom #57, April 1972 
    [Fanzine, edited by Camille Cazedessus, Jr. (= Caz).]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here

Harry Habblitz
   

Greatheart Silver
Notes by Phil about more stories in the Greatheart Silver series. The notes were found in his archives.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 14, October 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Charles Berlin
   

Hayy ibn Yaqzan, by Abu ibn Tufayl: An Arabic Mowgli
Essay about a human raised by animals, in this case a baby boy nursed by a doe. The feral man Hayy is often compared in this paper with Tarzan and Mowgli. 
  • Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts Vol.3 No.3, 1991
  • (as: "Hayy ibn Yaqzam by Abu ibn Tufayl: An Arabic Mowgli")
    Farmerphile Issue No. 4, April 2006

    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri. Illustrated by Keith Howell.]
  • (as: "Hayy ibn Yaqzam by Abu ibn Tufayl: An Arabic Mowgli")
    Up from the Bottomless Pit
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 978-1-59606-128-6, hardcover, 07/2007
    [Illustrated by Keith Howell.]

Jason Robert Bell
   

I Still Live!
Speech, the "75th Anniversary Dinner Keynote Address". This is the text of the speech, completed with the notes from PJF's original manuscript.

  • Farmerphile Issue No. 3, Janaury 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri. Illustrated by Charles Berlin.]
  • Up from the Bottomless Pit
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 978-1-59606-128-6, hardcover, 07/2007
    [Illustrated by Charles Berlin.]

Charles Berlin
   

Introduction
With the publication of his first story, "O'Brien and Obrenov", Farmer introduces himself, and tells us something about his life, his study and his career so far, and his family. During these years he "...met a lot of characters...".
  • Adventure, March 1946
    [Magazine, edited by Kenneth S. White.]
  • Farmerage Vol. 1 No. 1, June 1978
    [Fanzine, edited by George H. Scheetz.]

Griffith Foxley
   

Introduction (Memoir)
Not really an introduction to the story "Prometheus" - published in this book - but actually a memoir on Anthony Boucher, long-time editor of magazines and anthologies, who had died in 1968.
  • Special Wonder (Anthony Boucher Memorial Anthology of Fantasy and Science Fiction), edited by J. Francis McComas
    Random House, no ISBN, hardcover, 03/1970
  • Special Wonder - volume 1 (Anthony Boucher Memorial Anthology of Fantasy and Science Fiction), edited by J. Francis McComas
    Beagle Books (#95044), no ISBN, paperback, 01/1971
    [16 of the 29 stories from the hardcover.]

unknown
   

Jongor in the Wold Newton Family
Two discovered pieces of previous unpublished material, that was made for Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life. One is part of a family tree, and the second is a page of text explaining Jongor's position in the family.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 12, April 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri. With an introduction  by Win Scott Eckert.]

Keith Howell
   

The Journey
Article, in which Farmer explains the purposes of traveling as theme in literature, from ancient days to modern sf-times, giving many examples along the way: "...to allow the characters, and through them the readers, to undergo the concept-changing, character-shaping experience of travel and to reach the enlightenment and revelations of the unknown."
  • The New Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, edited by James Gunn
    Viking, ISBN 0-670-81041-X, hardcover, -/1988 
  • ("The Journey as the Revelation of the Unknown")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

Todd Radom
   

The Khokarsan Calendar
Essay, with the names of the years in a nine-year cycle, the names of the ten days in a week, and the names of the twelve months.


Bob Eggleton
   

Khokarsan Glossary
Essay, written by Philip José Farmer & Christopher Paul Carey (not credited in the book). This information comes from Carey himself: «"The Khokarsan Glossary" is mostly by Phil, but a little bit by me». About one hundred Khokarsan words are translated and explained.


Bob Eggleton
   

The Khokarsan Language
Essay, with a brief outline of the Khokarsan language, spoken in the city of Khokarsa about 10,000 B.C.


Bob Eggleton
   

L. Frank Baum
Essay, about the author of the Oz books and the characters in these books.
  • 20th Century Fiction, edited by George Woodcock
    Gale/St.James (Reference Guide to English Literature), ISBN 0-91228-919-8, hardcover, 07/1985
  • ("Witches and Gnomes and Talking Animals, Oh My")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

A Language for Opar
Article, in which PJF gives a thorough linguistic overview of the languages known and used by Tarzan in relation to Opar. He also describes the history of this place. PJF studied the history and language of ancient Opar from the books by Edgar Rice Burroughs and H. Rider Haggard before creating his own Opar novels.
  • ERB-dom #75, February 1974
    [Fanzine, edited by Camille Cazedessus, Jr. (= Caz).]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here


J. Allen St. John
   

The Legend of Mishiwapo
Subtitled: "A Speech to the Kiwanis".
With this speech Phil tried to give the listeners "...some idea of hoiw much work and time goes into writing a novel and how much revision and time go into producing the printed book...". In this case Phil was talking about his then to be published novel Nothing Burns in Hell.


Keith Howell
   

Letter of Discord

In this letter, originally published in the fanzine Discord #12 of May 1961, Farmer discusses the idea of writing a space opera titled Ramstan, which actually got published two decades later as The Unreasoning Mask.


Laura Givens
   

Like Some Opinions: Philip José Farmer
In 1960, Earl Kemp set forth these questions for his project "Who Killed Science Fiction?":
1) Do you feel that magazine science fiction is dead? - 2) Do you feel that any single person, action, incident, etc., is responsible for the present situation? If not, what is responsible? - 3) What can we do to correct it? - 4) Should we look to the original paperback as a point of salvation? - 5) What additional remarks, pertinent to the study, would you like to contribute?
One of the many authors and fans that answered these questions was Philip José Farmer. He had a short –and originally anonymous– entry in which he attacked Campbell about Dianetics, and an entry under his name answering at lenght the first two questions. The other three questions got (very) short answers.
  • Who Killed Science Fiction?
    in SaFari Annual #1, April 1960
    [Fanzine, edited by Earl Kemp. Only 125 copies.]
  • Who Killed Science Fiction? (The Compleat and Unexpurgated)
    in e*I*29, Vol. 5 No. 6, December 2006
    [Online fanzine, edited by Earl Kemp. With the originally for 1980 planned second edition.]
  • Who Killed Science Fiction? (Compleat & Unexpurgated), by Earl Kemp
    The Merry Blacksmith Press, ISBN 978-0-61544-103-0, trade paperback, 01/2011
    [Publication-on-demand of the second edition (2006) with a new introduction.]


Emsh


Emsh
   

The Lord Mountford Mystery
Essay. PJF researched the interesting coincidence, and found the evidence, that Henry Rider Haggard in his novel Finished (1917) wrote about the parents of the 'Lord Mountford' in Edgar Rice Burroughs's novel Tarzan the Magnificent (1939).
  • ERB-dom #65, December 1972
    [Fanzine, edited by Camille Cazedessus, Jr. (= Caz).]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here


Pete Poplaski
   

Lovers and Otherwise
Article. In this very long and also very interesting article Farmer tells the story behind the story "The Lovers", about writing it and especially the problems he encountered trying to get it published in a magazine. He had to defend himself somewhat against the editors about the ideas he used in this story. One of these editors "...considered my story potentially more dangerous than the most outrageous rantings of a minority-hater...". And that had nothing to do with the so-called sexual content of "The Lovers".
  • Fantastic Worlds Vol. 1 No. 3, Spring 1953
    [Fanzine, edited by Sam Sackett & Stewart Kemble.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here


Lee Hoffman
   

The Man Who Came for Christmas
Anecdotes about Randall Garrett, who lived for three years with the Farmers after he came over for Christmas in 1952. There is also a very funny anecdote about things that happened with Randall at the 1953 Ohio con: "...a young woman, naked, all her clothes under one arm, and screaming, ran past me. Then Randall, all his garments clutched to his chest, sped by me...".
  • The Best Of Randall Garrett, edited by Robert Silverberg
    Timescape, ISBN 0-671-83574-2, paperback, 01/1982


Rowena Morrill
   

Maps and Spasms
Very interesting autobiographical essay covering the years from childhood till 1952. According to the book: "Further installments of his autobiography will appear in future publications", but nothing more has been published since.
  • Fantastic Lives (Autobiographical Essays by Notable Science Fiction Writers), edited by Martin H. Greenberg
    Southern Illinois University Press, ISBN 0-8093-0987-4, hardcover, 01/1981
  • Mystery Scene Issue 28, January 1991
    [Magazine, edited by Kevin Randle.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Quentin Fiore
   

Mark Twain and Kurt Vonnegut Versus Free Will
Essay, the text of a speech Farmer gave at Fabula77, a science fiction convention in Copenhagen (Denmark) in May 1977. Phil examines the philosophies of the two writers, Twain and Vonnegut, about free will or determination, and compares this with his own ideas and other writers. Farmer concludes: «...no matter how exotic or fantastic, how stimulating to the imagination, how colorful the trappings, or how far the story goes, to the end of the universes or to the center of the Earth, the best stories of science-fiction are those who deal with the problems that most concern and perplex humanity, Infinity, eternity, determinism, free will, and especially immortality.».


Laura Givens
   

Memoir
Farmer's memories about the science fiction magazine If (aka. Worlds of If, 1952-1974). His first sale to If was the story "Heel" (1960), a very minor tale according to Farmer himself. After that there have been another seven issues of If with stories by Farmer. One of these stories, "Down in the Black Gang", is reprinted in Worlds of If.
  • Worlds of If (A Retrospective Anthology), edited by Frederik Pohl, Martin H. Greenberg and Joseph D. Olander
    Bluejay, ISBN 0-312-94471-3, hardcover, 09/1986 
    Bluejay, ISBN 0-312-94472-1, trade paperback, 09/1986
  • ("IF R.I.P.")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Alan Gutierrez
   

More Than Most
Remembrance and tribute to Robert Bloch who had died in 1994. PJF gives warm words about Bob Bloch and cites some lines from his letters and postcards, but feels "...that it's almost hopeless to portray him...".
Farmer also writes an introduction to Bloch's story "All on a Golden Afternoon".
  • Robert Bloch: Appreciations of the Master, edited by Richard Matheson and Ricia Mainhardt
    Tor, ISBN 0-312-85976-7, hardcover, 10/1995
    Tor, ISBN 0-312-86385-3, trade paperback, 10/1997

   

Myadzian Journal
Very early notes that Farmer wrote down, that later formed the rough basis of the World of Tiers series. The character Kickaha was mentioned here already.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 15, January 2009
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Notes on the Khokarsa Series
Handwritten notes, that «...show the development of certain ideas». These ideas were used in the final version of the novel. The notes are introduced by Christopher Paul Carey.
 

Bob Eggleton
   

Oft Have I Travelled
Article in which Farmer tells why he likes to enter the world of Solar Pons and of Parker, stories written by August Derleth.
  • The Pontine Dossier Vol.2 No.2, April 1969
    [Fanzine, edited by Luther Norris. Illustration by Frank Utpatel.]
  • The Solar Pons Gazette Vol. 1.1, Summer 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Bob Byrne. As PDF online.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

   

On a Mountain Upside Down
Farmer tells about his experience of mountain climbing. He did a hand-stand when he reached the top.
  • JD Argassy #55, 1960
    [Fanzine, edited by Lynn A. Hickman.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

   

Over All, After All
The text of a, humorous speech Farmer gave in 1993 at the Bradley University, because he was honored by being named 'distinguished scholar'. Farmer ends the speech with "the seven pillars of wisdom" or the "Maxims of the Ancient Days".


Keith Howell
   

Parables are Pablum: A Reply to Mr. Farmer, a Letter to Mr. Campbell
Written as by Tim Howller (pseudonym).
An essay, in which PJF criticises his own article "White Whales, Raintrees, Flying Saucers", published in the same issue of Skyhook. Farmer/Howller also calls to Mr. Campbell to dare to publish more interesting and literary stories in Astounding as he was publishing at the time.
  • Skyhook 23, Winter 1954-1955
    [Fanzine, edited by Redd Boggs.]
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 11, January 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]


   

Pecon 2 Guest of Honor Speech
The text of a speech Farmer gave at Pecon 2, in his hometown Peoria, in April 1971. It is about the low appreciation of sf. Readers of sf were called nuts or freaks. But in 1971 «... s-f has become commercially respectable and is on its way to becoming literarily respectable...».


Laura Givens
   

Philip Jose Farmer
Autobiography. For the entry in this book PJF wrote a piece about his life and career, which he ends with the words: "...After forty-one books and sixty-three stories, most of them science fiction, I plan to finish up in this field in the next three years. Then, on to mystery and mainstream...". Luckily for most of his science fiction fans that didn't come true for nearly twenty years after PJF wrote this, although he wrote a fine mystery novel then. The autobiography is completed with a critical comment about his work.
  • World Authors (1970-1975), edited by John Wakeman
    The H.W. Wilson Company, ISBN 0-8242-0641-X, hardcover [no dustjacket], -/1980

   

Philip Jose Farmer on Roger Zelazny
A loving tribute to Roger Zelazny. Originally written somewhere in the 1990s as a preface for an unknown collection of Zelazny's stories, but never published then. It was rediscovered in 2010 in Phil Farmer's archives.
  • Farmercon V (Program booklet)
    Michael Croteau, pamphlet, 06/2010, (16 unnumbered pages)
    [Privately published by Michael Croteau.]


   

Philip Jose Farmer Sez...
Essay, a short autobiographical piece about PJF's early discoveries on reading and his introduction to science fiction in the pulp magazines. He then decided that he too would become a writer of such stories, but had many problems to overcome before he actually sold his first sf story.
  • Apart #3, August 1976
    [Fanzine, edited by ?]
  • ("A Fimbulwinter Introduction")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006 


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

Philip Jose Farmer's Notes
These notes consist of:
- Early Notes on the Khokarsa Series
- Philip José Farmer's Outline
- Cross-Sectional Map of Opar
This documentation and manuscript was found among Philip José Farmer's papers. They give some background and extra information for the restored edition of Flight to Opar.
  • Flight to Opar
    Meteor House, ISBN978-0-9905673-1-8, hardcover, 08/2015


Bob Eggleton
   

Phonemics
Article. An interesting comment on using phonemic spelling by the editor of this fanzine and the many problems one encounters using phonemic or simplified spelling in print.
  • Gegenschein (A Personal Journal) #27, 1976
    [Australian fanzine, edited by Eric Lindsay.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Stephen Fabian
   

The Plants of Khokarsa
Essay, with a list of many plants brought in by the man known as Sahhindar, who tought the Khokarsans how to cultivate them.


Bob Eggleton
   

Polytropical Paramyths
In this piece, with bridging comments by the editors, is some explanation how Phil came to write his Polytropical Paramyths. They were based on his list of titles he had thought of to use for stories. Many titles didn't become stories, and sometimes Phil had started one, but didn't finish it.
One of the preliminary forms that didn't work out, is the outline and thoughts for "The Henry Miller Dawn Patrol". This one is much different than the later version.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 13, July 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Vladimir Verano
   

Pornograms and Supercomputers
Review of Stanislaw Lem's Imaginary Magnitude.
  • New York Times Book Review, September 2, 1984
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006 


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

The Purple Distance
This was originally written as a foreword for a proposed edition of The Song of Hiawatha, illustrated by Allen St. John, and to be published by Vernell Corniel. This article talks about connections between Longfellow and Edgar Rice Burroughs.


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

Reap
This is the text of the Guest-of-Honor Speech at Baycon, the 26th Worldcon, in San Francisco, CA.
See also the short bio of Phil in the Baycon Progress Report #2, and two profiles of Phil by Theodore Sturgeon and Poul Anderson in the Baycon Program Book.
  • Science Fiction Review #28, November 1968
    [Fanzine, edited by Richard E. Geis.]
  • A 14-page mimeographed limited edition for the benefit of the SFWA, 1968
  • "Guest of Honor Speech"
    Worldcon Guest of Honor Speeches, edited by Mike Resnick & Joe Siclari
    ISFiC Press, ISBN 0-9759156-3-0, hardcover, 08/2006

   

Religion and Myths
Article, an introduction to a chapter with this title, in which Farmer discusses his changing ideas about religion over the years. He beliefs in immortality and concludes that only stories that deal with this vital issue are serious stories: "If this conclusion is the triumph of irrationality over logic, so be it. After all, irrationality is the monopoly of sentients."
  • The Visual Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, edited by Brian Ash
    Pan Books (UK), ISBN 0-330-25275-5, trade paperback, -/1977
    Harmony Books, ISBN 0-517-53174-7, hardcover, -/1977
    Harmony Books, ISBN 0-517-53175-5, trade paperback, -/1977
    Book Club Associates, no ISBN, hardcover, -/1978
  • (Dutch: "Godsdiensten en mythen")
    Geïllustreerde encyclopedie van de science fiction, edited by Brian Ash
    Becht, ISBN 90-230-0287-3, trade paperback, -/1979
    [This edition includes information about Dutch fandom, it even mentions my name together with my fanzine Omega.]
  • (French: "La religion et les mythes")
    Encyclopédie visuelle de la science-fiction, edited by Brian Ash
    Albin Michel, ISBN 2-226-00691-5, trade paperback, -/1979
  • (Italian: "La religone è stata la prima forma di fantascienza")
    Religione, Miti e Fantascienza (Grande Enciclopedia della Fantascienza, No. 37), magazine, 01/1981
    Città e civiltà aliene e del futuro, edited by Francesco Paolo Conte
    Del Drago (Grande Enciclopedia della Fantascienza, Volume 5), hardcover, -/1981
    [Eight magazines of the series, the numbers 33-40, bound in one hardcover volume.]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Tim White


Tim White


Tim White
   

The Remarkable Adventure
Section introduction written with Beverly Friend: "What distinguishes the great adventure of the western and mainstream from the "remarkable" adventure, as we call the science fiction adventure? .... What is it that makes the remarkable adventure differ from the others?" Farmer and Friend answer these questions and explain the basic differences, giving several examples along the way. Then they introduce extensively the three remarkable stories - by Alan E. Nourse, Arthur C. Clarke and Cordwainer Smith - in this section of the book.
The book also includes Farmer's novelette "The Shadow of Space".
  • Science Fiction: Contemporary Mythology (The SFWA-SFRA Anthology), edited by Patricia S. Warrick, Martin H. Greenberg and Joseph D. Olander
    Harper & Row, ISBN 0-06-011626-9, hardcover, 06/1978
    Harper & Row, ISBN 0-06-046943-9, trade paperback, 06/1978


Mark Rubin
   

Remembering Vern
Phil remembers Vern Coriell, who died in January 1987. Vern was a long time friend of Phil, a fellow ERB fan and collector, and founder and editor of the Burroughs Bulletin. Phil shares with us some anecdotes about him during their friendship.


William Stout
   

Reply to Questionnaire
In 1963/1964 Bill Bowers and Bill Mallardi, editors of the fanzine Double:Bill, published in three installments in their fanzine the 72 replies from SF writers and editors to a questionnaire. They wanted to reprint these replies in one booklet in 1969, but used the opportunity to add another 22 brand new replies. One of the new ones is Philip José Farmer, who answers the eleven questions asked.
  • The Double:Bill Symposium, created by Lloyd Biggle, Jr. and edited by Bill Mallardi & Bill Bowers
    D:B Press, no ISBN, booklet, 1969

   

A Reply to 'The Red Herring'
Article, discussing the date of Tarzan's and Korak's birth. Farmer thinks that Korak is actually an adopted son of Tarzan.
  • Erbania #28, December 1971
    [Fanzine, edited by D. Peter Ogden.]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here


Bob Parker
   

Report
Farmer writes his impressions of his flight back from Rio de Janeiro, having been a guest - with several other sf people - of the Second International Film Festival, March 23-31, 1969 in this city. 
Actually, it's definitely not a 'report' of the film festival or anything like it, but a very interesting and funny article, what PJF himself calls: "This is what going to Brazil means to me, this is the travelog of the mind." This report ends with a note: "A friend to whom I showed this said, "You're one of the nuts on the cosmic tree Van Vogt talked about!"" Indeed he is.
  • Luna 6, 1969 
    [Fanzine, edited by Ann F. Dietz.]
  • ("The Josés From Rio")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

Jack Gaughan
   

Riverword Dawn
A brief outline and some notes for the never written 'sidestream' Riverworld novel Riverworld Dawn. Farmer did however use some of the ideas in his stories "Crossing the Dark River" and "Up the Bright River".
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 15, January 2009
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Robert Traurig Letters, The
Written by Philip José Farmer & Robert Traurig.
Essay of three witty letters these two friends wrote one another. The first and third by PJF and the second one by RT.


Keith Howell
   

A Rough Knight for the Queen
Essay and biography about Sir Richard Francis Burton, originally written in 1953 for a men's magazine, but never published.


Keith Howell &
Charles Berlin
   

Sherlock Holmes and Sufism—& Related Subjects
Subtitled: A Speech to the Baker Street Irregulars.
Text of the speech Phil Farmer gave in March 1975 before a local scion society of the BSI. It is about Sherlock Holmes' interest in Sufism.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 12, April 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri. With a foreword by Christopher Paul Carey. Illustrated by Charles Berlin.]

Keith Howell
   

A Slender Tribute to a Big Man
A tribute to long time friend of Phil and Bette Farmer, Robert Bloch. Never published, till it was found in Farmer's archives. According to the short introduction this piece was probably written to be printed in a convention program. It seems that Farmer had written this tribute in 1980, the same year Robert Bloch was the toastmaster at the 6th World Fantasy Convention. No idea why the tribute hadn't been used.


Laura Givens
   

Some Comments
Farmer's reaction to the article by Randall Hagan: "The Possible Subconscious Source of Philip José Farmer's Riverworld" in the same issue.
  • Moebius Trip Library's S.F. Echo #22, April 1975 
    [Fanzine, edited by Edward C Connor.]
  • ("The Source of the River")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

   

Special Review by Philip José Farmer
Farmer reviews How the Wizard Came to Oz, a novella written by Donald Abott and published in 1991 by Books of Wonder. This book is kind of a prequel to L. Frank Baum's Oz books. The first Oz book was published in 1900, which PJF read in 1925 when he was seven years old. About these prequel he writes: "..a fun trip for all Oz fans and for fantasy fans who still retain their childhood sense of wonder."
  • Locus #380, September 1992
    [SF newszine, edited by Charles N. Brown.]
  • ("Review of How the Wizard Came to Oz")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

   

Strangers & Brothers: Pitch to Publishers
Essay. A letter from 1970 to several 'prospective publishers' with an outline proposal of a mainstream novel that Farmer tried to sell. This mainstream novel, The Face That Launched a Thousand Eggs, was started by him in the 1950s.
"Strangers & Brothers: Francis Uquart", chapter five of this novel, is published in this anthology also.


Laura Givens
   

Tarzan's Coat of Arms
The publication of the by Farmer designed coat of arms of Greystoke, plus some editorial comment. This coat of arms can also be found on the cover of The Burroughs Bulletin #22 (see above) and in the book Tarzan Alive by Farmer.
  • ERB-dom #52, November 1971
    [Fanzine, edited by Camille Cazedessus, Jr. (= Caz).]


Pete Poplaski
   

Three Metafictional Proposals
Farmer seems to have had plans to write more metafictional books, about fictional characters. Like Tarzan Alive, but in two of these cases not on one character, but several characters. Proposed titles were The Lone Hero at the Bridge and Shadows with Flesh. The third would have been an 'autobiography' of Sir William Clayton, with the title Never Say Die.
The three proposals have bridging comments by Christopher Paul Carey.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 12, April 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Time Has Its Mirages
Notes for an outline of a story with the above title. According to the short introduction has the "Time" element from the proposed story been developed and utilized in the Tarzan novel The Dark Heart of Time.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 15, January 2009
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

The Tin Woodman Slams the Door
Series: Oz Universe.
Essay about loosing the good old-time sense of wonder reading a story when you grow up. It isn't the same story anymore when you come back much later.
Some think this a short story, but despite some kind of dialog in the text, this is not a story.
  • Destiny No. 10, Summer 1954
    [Fanzine, edited by Earl Kemp & Malcolm Willits. With three illustrations by Lin Carter.]
  • Oz-story Magazine No. 6, edited by David Maxine
    Hungry Tiger Press, ISBN 1-929527-02-0, large paperback, 09/2000
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006


Chesley Bonestell

John R. Neill
   

To the Wizard of Sci-Fi
A tribute to Forrest J Ackerman, guest of honor at Lunacon '74.
  • Lunacon '74 (Convention Program Book), April 1974
  • ("To Forry Ackerman, the Wizard of Sci-Fi")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006

   

The Two Lord Ruftons
Article, in which PJF compares the information and the data of the Lord Rufton mentioned in Sherlock Holmes's work with that in the work of the Frenchman Étienne Gerard.
  • The Baker Street Journal Vol.21 Nr.4, December 1971
    [Fanzine, edited by Julian Wolff.]
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • Online: read it here

   

Uncle Sam's Mad Tea Party
Notes by Farmer, found in his archives, for his planned novel, God's Free Beer, based on his experiences in the space-defence industry. The alternative title for this novel was Uncle Sam's Mad Tea Party.
See announced books.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 12, April 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

White Whales, Raintrees, Flying Saucers....
Guest editorial. Farmer defines the criteria for a good story and answers the self-asked question whether sf can fit the definition of good fiction.
  • Fantastic Universe, July 1954
    [Magazine, edited by Leo Margulies. In the same issue is also Farmer's story "The Celestial Blueprint".]
  • "White Whales, Raintrees, Flying Saucers"
    Skyhook #23, Winter 1954-1955
    [Fanzine, edited by Redd Boggs. A revised and much longer version of the article. It is followed by "Parables are Pablum: A Reply to Mr. Farmer, A Letter to Mr. Campbell" by Tim Howller (pseudonym of Farmer).]
  • Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
    [The original short version, because the revised version was only discovered after the publication of this collection in 2006.]
  • "White Whales, Raintrees, Flying Saucers"
    Farmerphile Issue No. 11, January 2008
    [Reprint of the revised version that was published before in Skyhook. Here it is also followed with the comment by Tim Howller.]

Alex Schomburg
   

Why Do I Write?
Writer Guest of Honor Speech given at the 1992 Conference for the Fantastic in the Arts.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 4, April 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri. Illustrated by Keith Howell.]
  • Up from the Bottomless Pit
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 978-1-59606-128-6, hardcover, 07/2007
    [Illustrated by Keith Howell.]

Jason Robert Bell
   

The Wild Weird Clime
The Balticon 11 Guest of Honor Speech (1977).
Farmer: «WILD WEIRD CLIME is also the title I've picked for a projected novel. Despite the title, it's not s-f. It'll be a mainstream novel about the wild weird wonderful exasperating troubling many-colored multivaried world of science-fiction and fantasy. I'll be outlining the novel to you.»

Vladimir Verano
   

A Writer's Prayer
Phil is 'praying' that never again will his word-processor lose 75 pages of single-spaced text without a trace.


Keith Howell
   

Writing the Biography of Doc Savage
Article. "The total story behind the one and only biography of Doc Savage".
  • Pulp #5½, July 1973
    [Fanzine, edited by Robert Weinberg. Special Pulpcon issue.]
  • ("Writing Doc's Biography")
    The Man Behind Doc Savage, edited by Robert Weinberg
    Weinberg, no ISBN, trade paperback, -/1974
  • ("Writing Doc's Biography")
    Pearls From Peoria
    Subterranean Press, ISBN 1-59606-059-X, hardcover, 09/2006
  • ("Writing Doc's Biography")
    Doc Savage: His Apocalytic Life
    Meteor House, ISBN 978-0-98837461-4-0, hardcover, 07/2013

Franklyn Hamilton
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© Zacharias L.A. Nuninga -- Page last updated: 14 Feb 2016