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Works about Philip José Farmer (6): E
The entries are in alphabetical order of the writer's name.
If more than one publication is mentioned, the publication of which a cover scan is included is indicated with a . Click on a cover to see it enlarged.


Edgeworth, Robert J. - "Lucian of Samosata and Philip José Farmer"

[No further information.]
  • Comparative Literature Studies, Vol.24 #2, 1987

   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Afterword"
In his afterword to Farmer's The Peerless Peer Eckert mentions a lot of names. Names of characters from the story, who are all tied and interrelated into the Wold Newton Universe.
See the Wold Newton Websites.


-
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Book of Magic"
Foreword, about how Eckert got his first Doc Savage books, that included Farmer's biography of this superhero, and about what happened with him when he had read the books during the years after. From collecting all Doc Savage stories, and other related heroes, to starting his Wold Newton Universe website, till the reissue of the 'Definitive edition' of Doc's biography.


Joe DeVito
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "A Chronology of Major Events Pertinent to The Evil in Pemberley House"
A chronology from the Spring of 1570 till the Spring of 1973.


Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "A Chronology of Major Events Pertinent to The Other Log of Phileas Fogg"
Afterword. This is what the title says, a chronology -from mid 1600s till 2140- to this novel.
See also the other afterword by Eckert in this book.


Amazing15
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Doc Wildman: Out of Time"
Article in which Eckert shares his discoveries about Doc Savage's life and family, based on information he got from an unpublished manuscript found at Farmer's home, from manuscripts from an anonymous source, and finally from another anonymous package with information he received.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 6, October 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]

Charles Berlin
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: The Farmerian Holmes"
Essay about Farmer's lifelong fascination with Sherlock Holmes, and the many ways he incorporated Holmes in his own writings, alone, with a 'stand-in', and together with Tarzan and Doc Savage.
  • Farmerphile Issue No.12, April 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: How He Escaped Publicity, Part II"
A reaction to the article "The Daughters of Greystoke" by Chuck Loridans and a further exploration about the supposed other children of Tarzan.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 3, January 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]

Charles Berlin
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: A Nova of Genetic Splendor"

A piece of history about the meteorite that came down in 1795 near the English village Wold Newton and the effect that has had on several people near the crash site, according to one historian (Philip José Farmer). This article is a good introduction to the Wold Newton Family.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 1, July 2005
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Ouroboros, Part I"
An introduction to several crossovers to Farmer's World Newton Universe by various writers.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 4, April 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]


Jason Robert Bell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Ouroboros, Part II"
Continuing the survey of Farmer's Wold Newton Universe crossovers by various writers.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 5, July 2006
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Philip José Farmer in the Wold Newton Family"
The Pièce de résistance in Eckert's series essays about the Wold Newton Universe. In this article Win proofs that Philip José Farmer is officially a member of the Wold Newton Family. You have to read this to believe it... Marvelously done!
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 15, January 2009
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]

Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott & Dennis E. Power - "Creative Mythography: Sahhindar through the Centuries"
A detailed chronology of the life of Sahhindar, aka. Gribardsun, aka. Lord Greystoke, aka. Zantar, aka. Tarzan, from the year 1888 till in the 24th century and beyond.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 13, July 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]
  • as: "Gribardsun through the Ages: A Chronology of Major Events Pertinent to Time’s Last Gift"
    Time's Last Gift
    Titan Books, ISBN 978-0-85768-965-8, trade paperback, 06/2012
    [Afterword, with a somewhat corrected and expanded second version of the timeline.]


Vladimir Verano
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: The Shades of Pemberley"
Introduction to part one of two of the story "The Shades of Pemberley". Eckert received an anonymous Sexton Blake story 'originally published in 1928', which features Doc Ardan (or Doc Wildman, aka. Doc Savage). This story proves some of Win Eckert's earlier discoveries.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 8, April 2007
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]


Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: The Shades of Pemberley, Part 2"
Introduction to the second part of the story "The Shades of Pemberley". See the above entry.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 9, July 2007
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]


Charles Berlin
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Six Degrees of Philip José Farmer"
Farmer introduced the Wold Newton Family (WNF) and referred in his further work, like The Adventure of the Peerless Peer, the Opar books and Ironcastle, at more members of this family but also at other people who are somehow linked. "...Farmer revealed that the Wold Newton Universe (WNU) has a rich history beyond the WNF...".
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 2, October 2005
    [Fanzine, edited by Christopher Paul Carey & Paul Spiteri.]


Karl Kauffman
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: This Peoria Earth"
An inventory of all the stories by Farmer which take place in the city Peoria, Farmer's hometown, under its real name or under a disguised name. Many of these stories also belong to the Wold Newton Universe.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 10, October 2007
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]


Jason Robert Bell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Trunks and Branches: The Wold Newton Family"
In this article is an explanation of the problems one encounters for to include, or exclude, a character in the Wold Newton Family. With this in mind some additions to the family are introduced. The Wold Newton researchers are now working on determining Farmer's exact place in the Family...

  • Farmerphile Issue No. 11, January 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri.]


Joey Van Massenhoven
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Creative Mythography: Excessively Diverted, Or, Coming to Pemberley House"
Eckert tries to explain the himself asked question why Patricia Wildman was identified as the sole heir to Pemberley House, while there were other children. There are three slightly different versions of the essay.
  • Farmerphile Issue No. 14, October 2008
    [Fanzine, edited by Win Scott Eckert & Paul Spiteri. Included with the essay is a Wold Newton Family tree.]
  • as: Excessively Diverted, Or, Coming to Pemberley House: A Further Excursion into Creative Mythography
    The Evil in Pemberley House (Limited Edition Chapbook)
    Subterranean Press, no ISBN, chapbook, 09/2009 
  • as "Afterword (Excessively Diverted, Or, Coming to Pemberley House: A Further Excursion into Creative Mythography)"
    The Evil in Pemberley House
    Meteor House, ISBN 978-0-9837461-9-5, trade paperback, 08/2014


Keith Howell
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Foreword to the 2014 Edition"
Win Eckert tells how he first met Lady Patricia Clarke Lupin Wildman, and that she had some worries at first about the completion of the novel by another writer than Phil Farmer. Later she said that she looked forward to the printed book.


Glen Orbik
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Foreword to the Bison Books Edition"
In this foreword Eckert explores the history of the fictional biography and where and why Tarzan Alive differs from the other fictional biographies. It is in this book that Farmer introduces the Wold Newton Family: "...Farmer's creation of the Wold Newton family elevated the fictional biography genre to a whole new level...".
  • Tarzan Alive
    Bison Books, ISBN 0-8032-6921-8, trade paperback, 03/2006
  • French: "Tarzan Alive"
    La Tribune des amis d'Edgar Rice Burroughs No. 64, March 2007
    [A Special Philip José Farmer issue, also with articles by Maurice Leborgne and by Michel Vannereux.]
  • as "Philip José Farmer's Tarzan Alive"
    Burroughs Bulletin New Series #81, Winter 2010
    [A Philip José Farmer tribute issue. The printed number 80 on the cover is a mistake.]
  • as "Philip José Farmer's Tarzan Alive: A Definitive Biography of Lord Greystoke"
    Super Stories of Heroes & Villains, edited by Claude Lalumière
    Tachyon Publications, ISBN 978-1-61696-103-9, trade paperback, 08/2013


Jean-Paul Goude
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Introduction"
An introduction to Farmer's screen treatment for Star Trek, but never used for the series, "The Rebels Unthawed".


Howell & Berlin
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Introduction: Myths for the Modern Age"

Introduction.
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005

John Picacio
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Only a Coincidence: Phileas Fogg, Philip José Farmer, and the Wold Newton Family"
Afterword, in which Eckert gives an explanation and a family tree to proof that Farmer is a member of the Wold Newon Family, and in fact a great-great-grandson of Phileas Fogg.
See also the chronology by Eckert in this book.


Amazing15
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Philip José Farmer (1918-2009)"
A biography about the life and works of Farmer.


Joe DeVito
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Philip José Farmer - Doc Savage Loses An Author"
A remembrance of Phil, because of his passing away in February 2009, about his Doc Savage related work, like the biography Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life and the Doc Savage novel Escape from Loki.
  • Big Book of Bronze, Volume 2, edited by Jay Ryan
    Solace of Fortitude Publications, no ISBN, trade paperback, 11/2009

Tim Faurote
   

Eckert, Win Scott - "Who's Going to Take Over the World When I'm Gone?"

Article.
  • Myths for the Modern Age (Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton Universe), edited by Win Scott Eckert
    MonkeyBrain Books, ISBN 1-932265-14-7, trade paperback, 10/2005
  • Online: read it here

John Picacio
   

Eckert, Win Scott & Carey, Christopher Paul - "The Wold Newton Tales of Philip José Farmer"
Introduction, in which the writers answer the self asked question: "What precisely makes a tale a Wold Newton tale?" They also wrote the story introductions.

-
   

Eckley, Grace - "Waking the Wake in Farmer's "Wage" "

Eckley opens his article with: "..Philip José Farmer's novella "Riders of the Purple Wage" profoundly echoes James Joyce's topics and techniques, chiefly in his glittering uses of the pun, from a spattering of languages and nationalities, and in his numerous allusions, plus plot and character and humor. The highly-allusive qualities of the work include allusions and finally references to Finnegans Wake. Particularly delightful for Wake scholars is the parody of themselves, that is, of their Wake criticism as a kind of fetish. Moreover, the story is sufficiently funny, naughty, and bawdy to please James Joyce himself..".
  • Farmerage Vol.1 No.2, October 1978
    [Fanzine]

   

Ellison, Harlan - "Introduction to "Riders of the Purple Wage""
An interesting article with Ellison's very positive opinion of Farmer and of this in his words finest story of the book: "...I am compelled by my awe of the story ... It is a jewel of such brilliance that re-examination and rereading will reveal facet after facet, ramification after ramification, joy after delight that were only partially glimpsed first time around...".
There is also an afterword to the story by Farmer.
  • Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison
    Doubleday, no ISBN, hardcover, 10/1967
    Doubleday/SFBC (#1179), no ISBN, hardcover, 10/1967
    Berkley (D2274), SBN 425-02274-9, paperback, 12/1972
    Signet (J6240), ISBN 0-451-06240-X, paperback, 01/1975
    Signet (E7634), ISBN 0-451-07634-6, paperback, 08/1977 4th
    Signet (E8502), ISBN 0-451-08502-7, paperback, -/1980 5th
    Berkley, ISBN 0-425-06176-0, trade paperback, 09/1983
    Gollancz, ISBN 0-575-04144-7, trade paperback, 08/1987
    Ibooks, ISBN 0-7434-4553-8, hardcover, 10/2002
    Ibooks, ISBN 0-7434-5261-5, trade paperback, 10/2002
    [The trade paperback has been issued with three different covers, by Michael Whelan, John Picacio and Robert Zohrab.]
    Ibooks/SFBC (#57362), no ISBN, hardcover, 05/2003
    Gollancz, ISBN 978-0-575-10802-8, trade paperback, 02/2012
  • Dangerous Visions 1, edited by Harlan Ellison
    Berkley (N1686), no ISBN, paperback, 05/1969
    [Volume 1 of three volumes. There is also a slipcased set.]
    David Bruce & Watson, ISBN 0-85127-060-3, hardcover, 02/1971
    [Volume 1 of two volumes.]
    Sphere, ISBN 0-7221-3300-6, paperback, -/1974
    [Volume 1 of three volumes; cover by Joe Petagno. The later undated reprint has a different cover, by Fred Gambino.]
  • (French: "Introduction aux Cavaliers du fiel")
    Dangereuses visions  (tome 1), edited by Harlan Ellison
    J'ai Lu (No.626), no ISBN, paperback, 11/1975
  • (Italian: "Introduzione")
    Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison
    Mondadori (Varia Fantascienza), ISBN 88-04-35083-0, hardcover, 09/1991


Diane & Leo Dillon


Diane & Leo Dillon
   

Ellison, Harlan - "Philip José Farmer: Portrait of the Artist as the Great Wall of China"

Portrait of Farmer in which his talent is being compared to the Great Wall of China. Ellison explains why Farmer's talent is the superior one of these two marvels. Written on the occasion of Farmer receiving the Grand Master Award 2001.
See also Wolfe, Gary K.
  • The Bulletin No.150, Summer 2001 
  • The Lovers
    [Brobdingnagian Press], no ISBN, pamphlet, 08/2002


George Barr
   

Endres, Christian - "Down by the Riverside"
An article about Farmer's Riverworld series, the main characters, the questions that arise on this world, the weak and the strong sides of the novels, and the history of how Farmer already started the fisrt story in 1952. Endres concludes that although the stories are somewhat dated , with "old-fashioned dialogues" they are still a good and interesting read after more than 30 years.
  • (German)
    Zitty Issue 15-2008, 17-30 July 2008

   

Endres, Christian - "Moderne Mythen"
Article, how Farmer came from the Riverworld to a family, and how that family became a universe, in this case the Wold Newton Universe (WNU). With information from Win Scott Eckert the author wrote a very good and insightful introduction to the concept of the WNU.
  • (German)
    Phantastisch! No. 34, April 2009


Michael Sagenhorn
   

Endres, Christian - "Der Napoleon des Crossovers"
Foreword, in which Endres states that we have a lot to thank to Philip José Farmer for his ideas in the crossover literature, where fictional or historical characters are treated as if they are real and still alive. Endres writes with great enthusiasm about this novel, «...zeigt der knackige Kurzroman auch nach all der Zeit noch einen Philip José Farmer in Höchstform, der sichtlich Spaß am Spiel mit einigen seiner persönlichen Favoriten hatte, während er Dschungel und Ziviisation, Instinkt und Deduktion, Abenteuer und Krimi sowie viktorianische Magazine und amerikanische Pulps aufeinandertreffen ließ.»


Mark Freier
   

Evangelisti, Valerio - "Introduzione"

Introduction about the history of the novel Venus on the Half-Shell and the use of the pseudonym Kilgore Trout when this novel first got published in 1975.

Franco Brambilla
   

Eyles, Allen - "Oz Inspires Writers..."
In this chapter of his book Eyles gives some names of science fiction authors who were inspired by Oz, like Ray Bradbury, Robert A. Heinlein, Keith Laumer, and especially Philip José Farmer with his novel A Barnstormer in Oz: "...his explanations are ingenious..."
  • The World of Oz, by Allen Eyles
    Viking (UK), ISBN 0-670-80871-7, hardcover, 1985
    Viking (US), ISBN 0-670-80871-7, hardcover, 1985
    Black Pig Editions (UK), no ISBN, hardcover, 1985
    [Special numbered, signed and slipcased edition.]
    Penguin (UK), ISBN 0-14-008474-6, large paperback, 1985
     
    HP Books (US), ISBN 0-89586-415-0, large paperback, 1985
    HP Books (US), ISBN 0-89586-415-0, large paperback, 1987


W.W. Denslow
   
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© Zacharias L.A. Nuninga -- Page last updated: 15 Dec 2015